Germany

There are some real Jewels in the Ithaka journal's article 55 uses for Biochar

http://www.ithaka-journal.net/55-anwendungenvon-pflanzenkohle?lang=en

Mr. Schmidt makes a good point that biochar provides more value when it's used for other purposes before it is worked into the soil, and then he does a nice job of laying out the pathways to do so.

One of my favorites

Cascading uses of biochar in farming with animals.

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Terra Preta: Homepage about Anthrohumox in Brazilian Lowland
Gerhard Bechtold, University of Bayreuth/Munchen, Germany, November 2007
Consultant for National (Geo-)Information Systems and Database Setup, for Natural
Resources Assessments


GIS MAP of Terra Preta Sites in the Amazon
Summary of Thesis about Anthrohumox in Brazilian Lowland (2007)


In the Amazon lowland, Oxisol developed in scattered areas to

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Tracing black carbon in soil using SEM/EDX, biomarker analyses, and compound-specific radiocarbon analyses
S. Brodowski (1), P. M. Grootes (2), W. Zech (3), W. Amelung (1)

Mollisols are known to contain stable, black humus components which originate from
charred or coal-derived particles. As such black carbon (BC) significantly affects soil
fertility and interferes with models on soil organic matter dynamics, an accurate prediction of BC input into soils and an elucidation of the mechanisms of BC turnover
is essential. The main aims of this study were (i) to identify the sources of BC in the

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Energy & Agricultural Carbon Utilization: Sustainable Alternatives to Sequestration
University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, June 10-11, 2004

Oral Presentations
http://www.eprida.com/eacu/orals.htm

Discovery and Awareness of Anthropogenic Amazonian Dark Earths (Terra Preta)
Bill Denevan - Prof. Emeritus, University of Wisconsin at Madison, Madison, WI USA

Explorations of Pre-Columbian Agricultural Landscapes in the Amazon
Clark Erickson - Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA USA

The Secrets of Making Terra Preta Soils

Terra Preta Homepage, Dark earths, Red Indian black earth
University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth, Germany 2002

Terra Preta (do indio) is a black earth-like anthropogenic soil with enhanced fertility due to high levels of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and calcium embedded in a landscape of infertile soils (see soil profiles below). Terra Preta soils occur in small patches averaging 20 ha, but 350 ha sites have also been reported. These partly over 2000 years old man made soils occur in the Brazilian Amazon basin and other regions of South America such as Ecuador and Peru but also in Western Africa (Benin, Liberia) and in the savannas of South Africa. Terra Preta soils are very popularby the local farmers and are used especially to produce cash crops such as papaya and mango, which grow about three times as rapid as on surrounding infertile soils.

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