Earth pit kiln

Traditional methods of making charcoal in the Philippines, can be inefficient, and the Village Coco Project would like to improve that, as well as creating a fair trade certified coconut char product, that they could sell to help improve life for the coconut farmers in Palawan.

The Village Coco Project has just built their First High Efficiency Kiln, and they look forward to testing the new kiln between now and the end of May.

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BIOCHAR PIT KILN is one of the simplest method of converting the crop residue and other biomass into Biochar / charcoal http://geo-biocharkiln.blogspot.com/. The farmers can easily create pits / trenches and convert the biomass residue (apart from using for compost, mulch, etc) otherwise wasted by burning in the fields openly. The tribals at Yerragondapalem (supported by NABARD / Sri Sai Educational Society), in Andhra Pradesh were trained in this method (GSBC Project), they are able to produce the biochar, preparing biochar compost and applying to their fields.
For more details see http://geo-biocharkiln.blogspot.com/

GSBC Project is supported by GoodPlanet.org, France and being implemented by GEO, Hyderabad

Also see "GEO BIOCHAR STOVE" http://geobiocharstove.blogspot.com/

* About 30% biochar production
* 3 to 4 days for a batch of charcoal production
* Continuous hot water access (pot 1)
* Highly suitable for institutional cooking and as well making biochar
* Additional heat generated by flaring the pyrolysis gases, used for cooking
* Mitigation of the emissions during the pyrolysis by flaring
* Costs about Rs. 3000 for a 2’ width x 5’ depth x 6’ hight (in feet) “GEO Biochar pit stove”. (cost including, tin sheet for cover, digging the pit, three pot stove and chimney.)
*_"GEO BIOCHAR STOVE" is designed by Dr. N. Sai Bhaskar Reddy, CEO, GEO. Demonstrated to farmers under the project Good Stoves and Biochar Communities Project, being supported by GoodPlanet.org, France

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Josiah Hunt, July, 2010

Josiah has a background in Agroecology and Ecology, and he has been working both in landscaping, and in making Biochar. See his web site for more details http://www.landscapeecology-hawaii.com/

His work is also noted in the July-August 2010 Audubon Magazine Field Notes: Please Smoke

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Charcoal in agriculture: Experimental research at Fourth Corner Nurseries
Richard Haard, Fourth Corner Nurseries, Bellingham, Washington, January 3, 2008

Greetings

I just finished over the last few days organizing images and data from my charcoal experimental plots. I am presenting a new set of posters showing root systems of the native shrub, Lonicera involucrata or black twinberry that I used as an experimental subject in these treatment plots this summer.

This will be the last of a series of piecemeal postings about my findings on the terrapreta reading list. In time, I will prepare a summary of what I have accomplished this year, the shortcomings, what I feel I have learned from this work about using charcoal and my plans for continuing this experiment for 2 or more growing seasons.

Charcoal Making
Rich Haard, Fourth Corner Nursery, Bellingham , Washington, March 31, 2007

Terrapreta interest group

Here is a set of images about our charcoal making project this weekend. It is a smothered pit method, first time for myself . We did open the lower end of the pit after 5 hours and take out about 40 gallons , then we put the unburned wood back in and recovered. We will be looking at it again in about 18 hours.

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Charcoal production for carbon sequestration (1.1 mb pdf)
Gustan Pari, Djeni Hendra, Dadang Setiawan, Mahpudin Saepuloh, Salim Soleh, Mad Ali (Forest Products Technology Research and Development Center) and Kiyoshi Miyakuni, Nobuo Ishibashi(Japan International Cooperation Agency) April 2004
Demonstration Study on Carbon Fixing Forest Management in Indonesia

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7-17 La Carbonera: Fun With Pit Kilns
Pacific Views, Natasha, July 21, 2006

So I need some charcoal for my project. I wanted it to be made of one type of local wood that would grow fast and also made good char. On the recommendation of several sources, we selected guaba wood, an Inga spp. After two or three years of growth, the trees can be pushing two stories high and are a popular species for shading coffee crops, so trimmings or full trees would be relatively easy to get.

July 21, 2006

7-17 La Carbonera: Fun With Pit Kilns

So I need some charcoal for my project. I wanted it to be made of one type of local wood that would grow fast and also made good char. On the recommendation of several sources, we selected guaba wood, an Inga spp. After two or three years of growth, the trees can be pushing two stories high and are a popular species for shading coffee crops, so trimmings or full trees would be relatively easy to get.

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